Posts Tagged ‘Qing Dynasty’

Sunday, June 19th, 2011 with 0 comments
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Update: As a few people informed me, there was some problems with the twitter & RSS feed notification system, however I think it has been resolved. Furthermore, while finishing up the final stages of my book I have had little time to post, so for those that  actually may have checked the website recently, I apologize for the lack of activity. However, at the moment I have more time and will resume posting. Please let me know if there is something that interests you. Hope the below posts spur some though... New Post / article + Recent Posts: For those…

Monday, May 16th, 2011 with 0 comments
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Lurking Warmth Original case by: Liu Bao-Yi (Liu Baoyi) (柳宝诒) Patient [Zhang] presented with physical cold and fever, no sweat, a wiry and thin pulse, and a yellow tongue [coat]. This was an exterior pathogen with food accumulation knotted up and not transforming. It was suitable to resolve both the exterior and interior. dan dou chi (Sojae Semen preparatum) da dou juan (Sojae Semen germinatum) zi su ye (perilla leaf) jing jie (Schizonepetae Herba) xing ren (Armeniacae Semen) zhi ke (Aurantii Fructus) gua lou pi (Trichosanthis Pericarpium) hui xiang tan (charred Foeniculi Fructus) jiao shen qu (Scorched  Massa medicata fermentata)…

Sunday, January 16th, 2011 with 0 comments
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Original Case by: Ye Tian-Shi (叶天士) [Patient] Zhao (44) [suffered from] chronic constraint and clumping. The five emotions had lead to ascending qi fire. There was Stomach qi counterflow resulting in a stifling sensation of the gastric cavity and no appetite. [This was a pattern of] excessive ascendant Liver yang and wind fire intimidating the orifices. Inevitably there was dizziness and painful obstruction of the throat. There was a feeling of cold, but this was not true cold. All of these signs are due to qi painful obstruction and lack of free flow. This disease [can be understood] from [the…

Monday, November 29th, 2010 with 0 comments
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Original Case by: Ye Tian-Shi (叶天士) (Case 6) - from Understanding Case Records Pt. 2 A 10 year-old presented with a mild cough and tidal fever. This was caused by childhood yin exhaustion and qi aspect heat. Di Gu Pi 3 qian (Lycii Cortex) Qing Hao 1 qian (Artemisiae Annuae Herba) Zhi Mu 1 qian (Anemarrhenae Rhizoma) Gan Cao 3 fen (Glycyrrhizae Radix) Nan Sha Shen 1 qian (Adenophorae Radix) Shi Hu 3 qian (Dendrobii Herba) Qin Bo-Wei's Commentary: This case is also a cough with Lung heat and yin exhaustion, but there is a tidal fever which in general…

Monday, November 15th, 2010 with 0 comments
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Original Case by: Ye Tian-Shi (叶天士) (Case 5) - from Understanding Case Records Pt. 2 There was exhausted yin existing in conjunction with contraction of a warm pathogen. There was a cough and head distention. It is suitable to use a light formula. sang ye (Mori Folium) xing ren (Armeniacae Semen) chuan bei mu (Fritillariae cirrhosae Bulbus) bei sha shen (Glehniae Radix) sheng gan cao (Glycyrrhizae Radix) tian shui li pi (Pyri Exocarpium) (pear peel) Qin Bo-Wei's Commentary: This and the previous case's symptoms and cause of disease are identical. In this case there was constitutional yin exhaustion, and moreover…

Tuesday, November 2nd, 2010 with 0 comments
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Original Case by: Ye Tian-Shi (叶天士) A warm pathogen assaulted the outer body. There was a cough and head distention. It is appropriate to clear the upper burner. [The prescription given was] Xing Ren (Armeniacae Semen) Sang Bai Pi (Mori Cortex) Jie Geng (Platycodi Radix) Zhe Bei Mu (Fritillariae Thunbergii Bulbus) Tong Cao (Tetrapanacis Medulla) Lu Gen (Phragmitis Rhizoma) Qin Bo-Wei's Commentary: This case's only presenting symptoms are cough and head distention, making it difficult to come up with a clear diagnosis. However since we are given the diagnosis of "warm pathogen assaulting the outer body" we can deduce additional…

Sunday, September 19th, 2010 with 1 comment
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Original Case by: Ye Tian-Shi (叶天士) [The patient's] pulse was thin and rapid. The thin [pulse] indicates visceral yin exhaustion and the rapid [pulse] indicates nutritive yin-fluid depletion. The previous summer and fall the patient was ill. Following this, there was a contraction of winter warmth leading to failure to store. In the spring when the earth's qi started to ascend, there was Liver wood stirring wind, resulting in right-sided atrophy. The collaterals at the root of the tongue were stiff leading to difficult speech. All of this was caused by a root base exhaustion pattern. The common treatment to…

Tuesday, September 7th, 2010 with 1 comment
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Original Case by: Ye Tian-Shi (叶天士) [The patient] had blood loss for many years with chronic damage to the yin qi. There was a relapse due to worry, sadness, and melancholy, where yang linked with internal wind which led to a great uprushing to the head (da mao 大冒). The blood residence became empty and qi overwhelmed the left side of the body, producing a deviated mouth, numbness and tingling in the limbs, dark tongue, inability to speak, and foot atrophy with an inability to walk. Obviously the Liver and Kidneys were deficient and famished, the yin qi was unable…

Thursday, August 19th, 2010 with 2 comments
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Original Case by: Ye Tian-Shi (叶天士) [The patient] had hemilateral withering on the left side of the body. [There was] blood deficiency not nourishing the sinews and bones, [leading to] internal wind assaulting the collaterals. The left pulse was moderate and large. Zhi Shou Wu (Polygoni Multiflori Radix Preparata) (baked) 4 liang Gou Qi Zi (Lycii Fructus) (stems removed) 2 liang Dang Gui Shen (Angelicae Sinensis Radix) (use that with a single stalk, remove the tips) 2 liang Huai Niu Xi (Achyranthis Bidentatae Radix) (steamed) 2 liang Tian Ma (Gastrodiae Rhizoma) (roasted) 2 liang Chong Wei Zi (Leonuri Fructus) (crushed,…

Wednesday, August 11th, 2010 with 0 comments
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Original Case by: Ye Tian-Shi (叶天士) [Patient] Zhu (32) [suffered from] depression, weeping, and grief that caused an internal stirring of Liver yang.  The yang qi transformed into fire wind. The [disease] had form and had sound, which [could be heard] passing through the diaphragm and gushing to the throat. There was a feeling of cold, but this was not true cold. The Inner Classic says that an excess of any of the five emotions leads to fire. [This condition] however, had not arisen from [an invasion] of external six qi. Medicinals such as  huang qin (Scutellariae Radix) and huang…